Souping: The new lifestyle trend

Souping: The new lifestyle trend

May 27, 2018

Similar to juicing, souping can be used to increase your daily intake of nutrients, and even to lose weight, by replacing meals with between 4 -6 liquid meals per day.

High fibre soups can be placed into your meal plan on a regular basis, either through a full-on soup cleanse or simply by replacing one meal a day.

Soup provides fibre and volume, hydration and a delivery system for foods which are typically easier to process than raw foods themselves.

It is usually lower in sugar than juice – but watch out for salt levels.

Souping can also assist weight loss if done correctly. While going on an all liquid, low calorie diet will lead to weight loss but if those soups aren't high in protein, it will also result in muscle loss.

Intermittent fasting helps with weight loss, decreasing inflammation in the body, reducing blood pressure, improving metabolism, and decreasing the risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

Taking a break from solid foods and having high protein smoothies or soups instead achieves many of the same health benefits while simultaneously helping people to feel full and guarding the muscles.

Nutritionists suggest souping for one day per week while you have weight to lose – and then swapping out either lunch or dinner for a soup every day. The soup should have at least 30 grams of protein and be less than 370 calories and nutrient dense.

While initial cravings might occur for the junk foods you’ve been eating, your tastes will start to change and your body will adapt.

The key is to eat the right kind of soup.

Avoid cans, and processed, salty, fatty soups.

Fill your day with all-natural, plant-based, slow cooked and blended soups, without chemicals or preservatives.

Go for organic ingredients and load your soup with dark leafy greens, add one to two herbs—think parsley and celery leaves—and include a variety of spices.

Here are a couple of recipes to get you started.

 

Red lentil and coconut soup

(Serves 6)

Mix one diced white onion, a tablespoon of fresh minced ginger, a finely chopped chilli and two peeled and chopped carrots in a large pot and fry with a little oil for about 10 minutes.

Add 3 tablespoons of cumin, 2 tablespoons of coriander, and a tablespoon of paprika, and mix well.

Add eight cups of vegetable stock and two cups of red lentils to the pot and bring to the boil, simmering for 10 minutes.

Add half a cup of coconut milk, a quarter cup of tomato paste and a 400g can of diced tomatoes and simmer for a further 20 minutes.

 

Tender and spicy green soup

(Serves 2)

Boil a litre of water in a pot.

Chop four celery stalks, one onion, a green bell pepper and five handfuls of spinach and add them to the pot.

Place a lid over the pot and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes.

Turn off the heat and add two whole garlic cloves, before blending.

Pour into two bowls, adding cream or coconut milk, and a little sea salt and black pepper to taste.

 




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