Why you should eat more mint

Why you should eat more mint

January 17, 2018

Mint aids digestion, relieves congestion of the respiratory tract and helps to lower blood pressure. This is all down to the content of Vitamin C, beta carotene, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium and iron found within mint.

Here are our favourite ways to incorporate mint into our diet;

Make your own flavoured yoghurts
Add mint to greek yoghurt with fresh fruit - mint and strawberries work particularly well together, as do mint and pineapple.  If you're always finding your fresh fruit is going off, you can now buy good quality frozen bags of mixed fruit which are designed especially for smoothies and yoghurt.

In salads
Tear up some mint leaves and add to any base of lettuce leaves for a health salad.  Steer clear of creamy dressings, try flavoured vinegars instead.  Our recent discoveries have been chocolate and chilli vinegar, and passionfruit.

In smoothies and flavoured waters
Mint is a great addition to fruit smoothies, juices and water.  Cucumber and mint is a classic combination for a flavoured water.  Or mix it up and try pineapple and mint.

In cous cous
Mint works well for flavouring cous cous. Mix it with lemon, roast red onion and pine nuts.  Perfect with tagines - or as an alternative to rice, serve it with curry.

Mint sauce
Mint sauce is a great accompaniment for lamb, but goes well with other meats too.  Grind up some mint with some sugar in a mortar and pestle and add some malt vinegar - it couldn't be easier to make your own mint sauce!



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